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Treat windows right and keep the warmth in during winter

Stegbar Timber Windows

As Australia cools after a record-breaking warm autumn season, it’s time to think about breaking out the winter woollens. As the mercury drops, Australians will be turning on the heating to maintain a comfortable temperature inside during the colder months.

Being able to trap the heat in can help ease energy costs for budget conscious households, while reducing the home’s carbon footprint for those with environmental concerns. How windows are treated can contribute to making the most of the heating in the home and keeping the warmth in during winter.

A simple step is to change the internal window coverings and swap to thick curtains for winter. Ensure that the curtains ‘fit’ the window as a snug fit on both sides will stop the warm air from going behind the curtain and cooling down. Installing a pelmet and adding thick curtains will create an insulating layer of still air on the inside of the glass.

The window’s orientation is important, because north facing windows will let the sun’s natural warmth in, while south facing windows can help it escape. “Throw open any curtains on windows that face north to take advantage of the sun during the day and close them at night to avoid heat loss through them,” advises Ms Evans. For south facing windows, consider keeping the curtains drawn even during the day to minimise heat loss.

A glazing treatment on the glass will help to stop warm air cooling as it hits the window and, the thicker the glaze, the better the insulation. “These days, double glazing is quite common in Australia. We’re also seeing a demand for low emissivity (low-e) glass combined with double glazing, which provides a great energy-efficient solution,” says Ms Evans.

Low-e glass is designed to prevent heat escaping through windows to the cold outdoors thanks to an invisible coating that dramatically reduces heat transfer, reflects interior heat back into the room and reduces the amount of ultraviolet and infrared light passing through the glass. In winter, low-e glass maintains over a third more heat inside than standard glass.

When renovating or building, homeowners should think strategically about floor plans and the positioning of windows and awnings to trap the winter sun more effectively. By taking advantage of natural light and heating opportunities that can be built into a home, homeowners can save on ongoing energy costs for years to come.

The window frames themselves can help to keep warmth inside the home, with thermally controlled systems and timber having better insulation properties than aluminium. “Timber naturally provides a thermal barrier and significantly reduces heat transference,” explains Ms Evans. “Thermally broken or controlled window frames or those made from timber conduct less heat and perform really well when paired with double glazing or low-e glass, contributing to better energy efficiency.”

Ms Evans also suggests sealing any gaps where air can escape. There are a number of DIY sealing products readily available in the market. Check for obvious gaps by looking for visible light or movement in curtains and listening for rattles or whistling around windows.

Stegbar offers an extensive range of windows including architectural, awning, bi-fold, casement, double hung, fixed, louvre, sashless and sliding.


Tips for ‘treating’ windows for winter
  1. Choose a timber window frame to reduce heat transference
  2. Opt for double glazing or low-e glass
  3. Seal any gaps around windows
  4. Install a pelmet
  5. Change to curtains made from a thick, heavy material
  6. Open curtains during the day to let in sunlight and close at night to retain heat
9/05/2017 12:00:00 AM - Stegbar
Stegbar Timber Windows

As Australia cools after a record-breaking warm autumn season, it’s time to think about breaking out the winter woollens. As the mercury drops, Australians will be turning on the heating to maintain a comfortable temperature inside during the colder months.

Being able to trap the heat in can help ease energy costs for budget conscious households, while reducing the home’s carbon footprint for those with environmental concerns. How windows are treated can contribute to making the most of the heating in the home and keeping the warmth in during winter.

A simple step is to change the internal window coverings and swap to thick curtains for winter. Ensure that the curtains ‘fit’ the window as a snug fit on both sides will stop the warm air from going behind the curtain and cooling down. Installing a pelmet and adding thick curtains will create an insulating layer of still air on the inside of the glass.

The window’s orientation is important, because north facing windows will let the sun’s natural warmth in, while south facing windows can help it escape. “Throw open any curtains on windows that face north to take advantage of the sun during the day and close them at night to avoid heat loss through them,” advises Ms Evans. For south facing windows, consider keeping the curtains drawn even during the day to minimise heat loss.

A glazing treatment on the glass will help to stop warm air cooling as it hits the window and, the thicker the glaze, the better the insulation. “These days, double glazing is quite common in Australia. We’re also seeing a demand for low emissivity (low-e) glass combined with double glazing, which provides a great energy-efficient solution,” says Ms Evans.

Low-e glass is designed to prevent heat escaping through windows to the cold outdoors thanks to an invisible coating that dramatically reduces heat transfer, reflects interior heat back into the room and reduces the amount of ultraviolet and infrared light passing through the glass. In winter, low-e glass maintains over a third more heat inside than standard glass.

When renovating or building, homeowners should think strategically about floor plans and the positioning of windows and awnings to trap the winter sun more effectively. By taking advantage of natural light and heating opportunities that can be built into a home, homeowners can save on ongoing energy costs for years to come.

The window frames themselves can help to keep warmth inside the home, with thermally controlled systems and timber having better insulation properties than aluminium. “Timber naturally provides a thermal barrier and significantly reduces heat transference,” explains Ms Evans. “Thermally broken or controlled window frames or those made from timber conduct less heat and perform really well when paired with double glazing or low-e glass, contributing to better energy efficiency.”

Ms Evans also suggests sealing any gaps where air can escape. There are a number of DIY sealing products readily available in the market. Check for obvious gaps by looking for visible light or movement in curtains and listening for rattles or whistling around windows.

Stegbar offers an extensive range of windows including architectural, awning, bi-fold, casement, double hung, fixed, louvre, sashless and sliding.


Tips for ‘treating’ windows for winter
  1. Choose a timber window frame to reduce heat transference
  2. Opt for double glazing or low-e glass
  3. Seal any gaps around windows
  4. Install a pelmet
  5. Change to curtains made from a thick, heavy material
  6. Open curtains during the day to let in sunlight and close at night to retain heat